Getting away with rape and murder

It seems one cannot open an Indian newspaper without reading about at least one rape happening somewhere every day.  This time it is a gang rape of a journalist in Mumbai.  The bastion of the last city supposedly safe for women has also fallen.  Mumbai continues to be much safer for women than many other…

On marrying your rapist in the name of law

What is worse – being sentenced to twelve years in prison because you were the victim of a rape, or being “pardoned” by your country’s  President on the condition that you marry your rapist, thus entering a lifelong hell? Gulnaz’s story is horrific at multiple levels.  A system which charges rape victims with adultery is…

Why FIFA is wrong about banning Iranian women

It’s depressing how those Iranian women footballers are getting kicked around like footballs.  The question is – can they play football with their hijabs or headscarves on? On one side, there is FIFA, sticking rigidly to its stand that hijabs can cause “choking injuries” and are thus unsafe to wear.  On the other side, you…

Stealing from Indian women is universal ?

In the past, I’ve written about theft from passengers’ bags by baggage handlers in Indian airports, and the mysterious chalk marks used by customs officials to mark certain bags for special treatment. Little did I know that singling out NRIs for stealing from their bags is an international practice.   According to this news article, Michael…

Why I dislike the Bharat matrimony ad

With the cricket World Cup going on, I have been watching a lot of Willow TV.  There are a lot of  NRI targeted ads, but one in particular irritates me considerably. It doesn’t help, either, that given the frequency of ads and the constant repetition, I watch this particular ad quite a few times everyday. …

Why Indian women scientists drop out

The other day, there was an interesting article in the Hindu on the subject of why women scientists drop out.  The article quoted two research papers, which tried to analyze why there were so few women scientists at the highest levels. The first is the one by Kanta Rani and Rajesh Luthra of CSIR’s human…

Do we need a dress code at work?

So UBS has finally revamped its much-criticized dress code.  The WSJ reports that the new version is a much more  sober version than the hilarious original dress code. “Men will be required to wear a dark-colored suit, a white shirt and a red tie, and women a female equivalent of this,” Mr. Kern said. The…