The years, they creep up

Years creep up before you know.  There were some posts I’d written a long time back, which have always remained  in suspended animation.  They are not drafts because they are complete.  They are not published because I don’t like them all that much.  So they have been sent way with a promise of future publishing.

WordPress makes this easy for you.  You just think of a date in the distant future, and set the post to publish on that date.  The post is happy, you are relieved at not having to hit “delete” and everyone goes home in peace.

Except, that “distant future” has a way of sneaking up on you.  I suddenly noticed that if I didn’t do something, one such post would get published in a few weeks.  Of course, when I wrote it, 2009 seemed a long way away.  Wasn’t 2010 somewhere well in the future, when we would have artificial stars created and spacecraft investigating monoliths on Jupiter?  Oh well, I’ve been reading too much Arthur C. Clarke.

I wish these science fiction writers wouldn’t set their dates so close in the future. It’s the same way I set future publishing just a year or so ahead.  Years have a way of sneaking up.  Shouldn’t they safely talk about 2900 or 10,050 or some year that’s really in the future so we know we will not be invaded by aliens any time soon?

How disappointing to find that all we have to show for 2009 is a recession, a Ponzi scheme and some large Institutions collapsing.  Not exactly the stuff of science fiction.

The years seemed to move much slower when I was in school.  Does the human body perceive years differently depending on ones age, I wonder?

Does time pass slower when you are young, because each day has something new and interesting?  Does time slow down when you are very old, because each day is either a struggle with failing health, or because the endless hours from dawn to dusk hold the promise of complete boredom?

Is it then, only the years in between that fly so fast?  The middle years, the period when we pretend to teach ourselves new tricks without ever learning much, when we busy ourselves in silly things and wonder where the time went away?

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5 thoughts on “The years, they creep up

  1. Lekhni

    You know how little kids say they are ‘4 years and 5 months old’ or something similarly precise. And then people say over the hill, past one’s prime and pushing 50 and so on. Both are watching time go by at the same pace. The former have too much energy (and not enough work) so they can sit and count every minute, day, week, month that passes. The latter have too much work that drains their energy so that is how they feel years are creeping by. Same time, different observers. Anyway that is my explanation 🙂 I have not noticed the pace of time change much. On a day to day basis, perhaps, yes but I recover my lost time by scheduling leisure 😉

  2. you know i have this hypothesis about age and relativity. if you see when you are very young – even a person who is two years older seems much bigger and older and grander over all. every day seems long. every year seems eternal. as you grow older the sizes become relatively smaller to your size and before you know it even a person two decades here and there seems like a peer.

    And as you said, after a point every time the days are homogeneous, it gets blurred into blocks of days rather than individual days – which is why it seems shorted.

    AND i have a post on this same topic in my drafts folder which i haven’t posted becoz i dont like it.

  3. Yes, one perceptions of time passing are so relative.
    Past fifty time seems to gallop. And maybe one is slower in completing different tasks, so the time seems to disappear even faster:(

  4. My first time here and I must say, you write exceedingly well.

    It’s strange how there are so many of us who feel the same way about time moving too fast!

  5. I just now saw that maybe looong back you had asked for my e-mail id.
    I wasn’t blogging so hadn’t checked comments etc., so sorry

    Guess this comment gives you my e-mail too

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